Chimp Choc Chip

Hey folks, it’s a few days late but I decided to make you something for white day, after all.

And, of course, it was always going to be late. I don’t do recipe posts on thursdays.

This weekend, though, I’ve made something thematically appropriate for you all to have a go at: Chimp chocolate chip cookies, using the leftovers from my recent review.

Truth be told, they didn’t come out exactly as I’d planned but they were so soft, cakey and tasty that I had to share them, regardless.

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Refritos Sweet Potatoes

It’s the last weekend of the month again, folks, and I’m sure you know what that means by now. It’s recipe time.

This february’s main dish, however, isn’t entirely my own. It’s an adaptation of one of Sorted Food’s latest and, if you haven’t heard of them, I strongly suggest that you check out their 📽️ baked potato recipe video 📽️ before continuing.

They’re a great fun channel, fully focussed on food, with the knowledge of professional chefs but far more of a down to earth approach. I’ve been hooked on them for months.

Yet, for the first time today, I feel like I’m qualified to take on one of their recipes and give my own twist. Maybe even improve it. Because real mexican food has been passed down to me, through the generations, from real mexican chefs. And chillies, well, they’re kind of my thing.

So, for this month’s recipe, I’m taking their sweet potato stuffed with refried beans and giving it what they would call a “level up”!

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Scotch Rarebit

Hey there, everyone. Today, we’re going to be working on a rarebit. Or, as it’s sometimes known, a posh cheese on toast.

It’s a quick and simple recipe but not so simple that it’s just slapping cheese onto bread and grilling it. That’s regular cheese on toast and I’d be embarrassed to post anything that basic.

No, today’s recipe involves a proper cheese sauce, with strong, dark, savoury, boozy overtones, just like the traditional british dish. Only, for mine, I’m paying a little homage to my scottish origins and changing up the alcohol.

Instead of beer, I’m using 📽️ The Whisky Sauce Co’s Scotch & Bonnet Beverage 📽️ – Legally not a hot sauce and definitely not a sauce that is hot.

BonnetBev

It was, however, rather delicious and utterly perfect for today’s recipe. Just expect it to be rather milder than the last.

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Mad Dog Burger Topper

Howdy, peeps, it’s recipe day again and, while I don’t plan on doing this every week, I do have another mini one for you today. One that makes use of Mad Dog’s 25th Anniversary Gold Edition.

Why? Because something has to.

It’s a tasty sauce. A great blend of mellowed out reapers, scorpions and ghosts that even tastes rather mexican. It’s gentle on the palate but not even remotely gentle on the rest of the body. A brutal assault on one’s sense of heat at a freakin’ crazy

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A heat that renders it inedible for all but the most hardcore of chilli lovers and was enough to send me and my friends loopy 📽️ with a single mozzarella stick 📽️.

So it should come as no surprise that I’ve barely touched my bottle since. I just don’t want that kind of mouth-hurting, mind-destroying challenge spice very often and my video reviews more than satiate any such need that I might have.

It is, therefore, about time I toned it down a bit. Made a secondary sauce out of it that’s only super hot, not beyond nature. Something that at least the crazy people, like me, might enjoy.

Here it is, my Mad Dog burger topper recipe.

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Appledrop Tart

Hey folks, today it’s tart time.

For this month’s recipe, or perhaps its bonus recipe, if you consider my mousse cake the main one, I wanted to make a spicy apple tart with a touch of my old favourite lemondrop powder. A similar combination to some of the flavours in my fruit risotto from way back but without its pear or morrocan spices, giving a very different end result.

Unfortunately, though, this one didn’t work out as planned.

I did my research, found out the science behind the perfect apple pasty and quickly realised that I didn’t have the tools to make it. I could only make a tasty second best that will, I’m afraid, have to suffice for the time being.

But I will still explain how and why, with a more professional kitchen than mine, you could go that extra mile towards perfection.

Either way, though, the ingredients are the same and they end result it highly enjoyable.

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Winter Ginger

Good general holiday season, everyone. I hope you’ve been enjoying it and that the coming turn of the year treats you well.

I’ll be making a vaguely themed review post then (and it’s going to be a goodie!) but, in the mean time, here’s a simple recipe to tide you over.

Not one for christmas food, per se, since I gave you that last month but one for some nice, warming, earthy gingerbread – A seasonal special all the same.

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The Jerk that Stole Christmas

Merry early christmas, everyone. It’s the end of november again and therefore time for another seasonal dessert. This time, a quick and easy take on christmas cake, with a blend of jamaican-style spices.

It’s not going to be a traditional jerk flavour, since it lacks any thyme, but it’ll still bring together the fragrant peppercorn flavour of allspice and black pepper with some christmassy dried fruit and the blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves that both influences share.

A real taste of the season but also of the caribbean.

Plus, I swapped out the chillies in my old “mincemeat” recipe for a couple of scotch bonnets to give this cake a little bit of extra jamaican goodness and I strongly suggest that you do the same. Continue reading

Passion Fruit Dansak

It’s that time again, everyone. Time for my recipe of the month. And this month, I’m going to be using one of the peppers that I picked up in challock.

Cereja

The cereja roxa*.

Why? Well, two reasons really. One, they’re starting to look a little old and wrinkly so I really do need to use up the last of them. And two, I was wanting to revisit this dish anyway and I thought that it would be the perfect fit for such a fruity chilli.

If, however, you don’t have access to the cereja roxa or its relatives, today’s curry will still work great with the scotch bonnet’s more savoury, earthy fruitiness. Just don’t expect it to have the same light and refreshing top notes.

Because, despite being a rather gentle flavour, this rare pepper really pulls its weight when cooked into my passion fruit dansak.

And yes, this is a dish that I’m rehashing but it’s one that you’ve never seen before. One that I first made for a shokugeki, prior to ever writing this blog.

It was formulated to showcase lentils as an ingredient, without sitting heavily on the stomach like a full on daal, and it was created to capture the hearts of vegetarian chilli lovers, without relying on overly rich additions like soy or black garlic.

It was a winner at the time but, with the light and refreshing quality of its new chilli and a few years worth of refined cooking techniques, today’s version is greater than it ever was before. I just know that you’ll love it.

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Lemon Spice Salsa

Hey there everyone, do you like mango, citrus and salsa? If so then I’ve got the perfect recipe for you!

Today’s is exactly that, with lemon, lime and the lemon spice jalapeño that I recently found all building on a smooth and fruity mango base. Naturally a little sweet but so fresh and tart that it’s definitely not dessert.

Instead, this recipe is an excellent dip for tortilla chips and samosas, a great way to liven up a salad or bean burger, a terrific topping for tacos or the perfect accompaniment to oily fish. Among other uses that I haven’t yet discovered, I’m sure.

And, while it does use a particular numex chilli that I found at challock chilli fest, you can make some substitutions if you don’t have access to it.

I don’t see the lemondrop/aji limon working here because, while it would compliment the citrus, it lacks the yellow pepper and jalapeño-specific notes that help it stand out. Instead, I would recommend the milder, 📽️ regular yellow jalapeños 📽️ if waitrose has them ripe again, orange or yellow habaneros if you want a bit more fruitiness and heat or any of the roxa family of peppers if you can get them, because they, too, are delightfully fruit flavoured.

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The True Vindaloo

Hey there spice lovers, this month I’m hanging out at my buddy Exban’s place for a nice romantic wine and dine.

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Why? Partially because his girlfriend dumped him but mostly because I felt like making a proper vindaloo and needed someone to finish off the booze with. An explanation that, if anything, only raises more questions.

Since when did a vindaloo have wine in it? Why is there alcohol in an indian dish when the nation’s religions are so against it? And why can’t I drink it all myself?

Well, for starters, the vindaloo, or vin d’ aloo, isn’t an indian dish. It comes from goa and uses indian spices, certainly, but goa wasn’t a part of india at the time. Goa was officially portuguese and portuguese cooking had no such anti-alcohol restrictions. They were more than happy to be working with wine.

Their earlier dish, the “carne de vinha d’alhos” from which the vindaloo was derived, got its name from its three key ingredients: Pork, wine and garlic. Three ingredients to which the goan people added coriander, turmeric, chilli and a whole host of other spices, along with potatoes to bulk it out and keep the heat from getting too high.

Because, unlike today’s vindaloo, their vin d’ aloo wasn’t meant to be the hottest dish on any menu. All they wanted was a full-on fiery flavour to their marinated meat.

And, while even most “traditional” recipes pull from a later date, once the wine had been swapped for vinegar, I’m going to be taking it right back to its origins, today, with a rich and fruity red wine.

So, let’s get started, shall we?

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