Spirit of the Caribbean

Happy tuesday again people, it’s time for us to return to wales and experience a second sauce from Chilli of the Valley. One with the same pineapple and coconut flavours that ruined Saucey Lady’s Fireman’s Watch for me but one that gives them the centre stage, instead of pairing them badly with other, more savoury fruit.

This one is their Calypso – A sauce designed to mimic the classic piña colada cocktail’s flavours, with pineapple, coconut and rum.

Calypso

And this time, I see no reason why they won’t work.

To be truly sure, though, I’m going to have to put this sauce to the test.

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Dragon’s Breath Chocolate

Hey there chilli lovers, it’s the weekend again and, this week, I feel like paying a little tribute to one of my fellow bloggers.

Not a pure food blogger this time, like I’ve Got Cake’s Dana (who inspired my superhot brownie recipe), but one who I’m a big fan of all the same. One who’s stunning pictures of the australian landscape feed my love of bright colours through winter just as much as their recipes make me hungry throughout the rest of the year.

Today, we’re looking at Eat Live Escape and the simple tweaks that turn their recent Dark Cherry Chocolate Bark into an insanely hot, chilli lover’s treat.

Do be warned before I begin, though: This isn’t for the faint of heart or tongue. Today’s recipe uses one of the world’s hottest chillies and winds up reaching a crazy

7.5/10

Heat

that comes close to double the strength of my own hottest past recipes, let alone what restaurants will typically serve. And it’s not like you’ll just be putting a little bit on your meal like with a sauce, either.

If you’re sure you know what you’re getting into, feel free to click on through to the recipe but don’t say I didn’t warn you. For even most chilli fans, ELE’s original recipe will likely be more suitable. My chocolate bark really is just for the select few who eat things unreasonably hot.

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Rhubarb Red

Today, everyone, I have another fruity red sauce for you but, even so, it’s nothing like the one that you saw last week. No, what we’re going to be looking at this time is another of the sauces I got from Saucey Lady and one that, as a specifically UK-based reviewer, I couldn’t pass up.

FiremanBottle

You see, this sauce, known as their “Fireman’s Watch”, is primarily a blend of scotch bonnets and the one fruit that yorkshire is really known for: Rhubarb.

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White-Label Wonders

So this tuesday we’re going to be looking at another pair of products but it’s not a comparison post.

Instead, I have for you a couple of white label items from a single seller that we’ve already seen stuff from. It’s Daddy Cool’s!

Back again with some rather unusual recipes.

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Cooking With Vanilla

Hey folks, it’s the last weekend of the month so it’s time for another recipe. This one, however, is a little different to most.

It’s an adaptation of something I found in Janet Sawyer’s vanilla cookbook, kept mild and made vegetarian (vegan even) to suit the relatives I’m eating with. Yet, for those who do want it, I’ll be giving instructions on how to sub the meat back in.

The tofu may add texture to the dish and it’s an unusual but lovely vanilla curry either way but, for those who do eat it, chicken would most definitely help to bring the flavours together and give them a base on which to build.

Regardless of which version you choose to make, though, I’ve made a few other tweaks to ensure that you get the best possible flavour from the curry, while also highlighting a more interesting chilli.

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Formerly Mild

Hey everyone, this week it’s recipe week and I’d like to talk to you about one of my favourite curries.

The humble korma, however, doesn’t have the best of reputations, being considered both too mild and too desert-like to be called a “proper curry” by many.

It’s the sweet, rich, creamy, coconut-heavy and utterly chilli free dish used to introduce people to the spices of indian cuisine but, in my opinion, it’s a little more than that.

Made well, the almond, coconut and dairy base of this dish gives it the unique, rich, mild and milky flavour you might expect, ideal to be built upon with other things, such as its often quite complex spice palette. In fact, it’s a perfect carrier for these spices because, as with chilli, their flavours are mostly oil based, allowing them to be absorbed into the milk fats quite easily to spread throughout the meal.

But, depending on where you look, you’ll see many variations on the korma, some of which have rather different ideas on what flavours should permeate its thick, underlying sauce.

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